College Auditions

There will be two types of audition submissions available:
  • College Auditions: the traditional opportunity for 2020-21 Juniors and Seniors to submit audition materials for participating colleges and universities
  • College Prep Auditions (NEW): opportunity for 2020-21 Freshmen and Sophomores to submit audition materials for participating colleges and universities to review and offer feedback for improvement
Audition Guidelines for students

Musical & Acting: 

Performance audition videos must:

  • Be ninety seconds long (no longer than two minutes including slate and transition between pieces).

  • Contain two contrasting pieces (one song and one monologue OR two monologues).

  • Be solo presentations.

  • Begin with an introductory slate: name and titles of selections being performed. 

  • Use a track if singing. NO a capella submisisons are permitted.

Helpful Tips:

  • Avoid selections with dialects, accents, or any classical material if not trained in those areas. 

  • Show your range -- choose selections that showcase different aspects of your skill.

  • Selections should demonstrate your best work.

    • Highlight your ability to create a dynamic character

    • Choose a piece that allows you to tell a story -- shape, subtext, and resonance are important.

  • Rehearse your full audition, including your transition between pieces. 

    • While your slate does not count toward your ninety seconds, you should still rehearse what you plan to say -- name and title of pieces are sufficient.

    • Remember to consider your blocking and physicality in addition to your text work.

    • Don't forget facial expressions!

Video Audition Tips:

  • Consider your frame (how much of your body you want to show during your audition). At a minimum, make sure to show from a few inches above your head to your belly button.

  • If performing a song, make sure you have a solid track to use for your accompaniment.

    • Pay an accompanist to record a track for you and send you an .mp3 file. Try reaching out to your local university's music or theatre department as a start.

    • Find a karaoke track online. Make sure there are no vocals on the track.

  • Consider where you're placing your "scene partner." You do not need to look straight into the camera.

  • You may use one straight back chair and one small table in your video; additional set pieces are not allowed. 

Filming Your Audition:

  • Find an effective filming location

    • Area should be quiet so we can hear both you and your track (if applicable).

    • Film in front of a non-distracting background. If possible, choose a solid-color wall or consider hanging a sheet behind you.

    • Dress neatly, and in a contrasting color from your background. No costumes.

    • Make sure you are lit enough to be clearly visible.

  • Reminders

    • Before filming, conduct a full-volume test to make sure you can be heard (and that your track can be heard).

    • Ensure your blocking is effective and visible when filmed. Consider whether to decrease your movement or to adjust your camera angle.

    • Shoot your video horizontally, not vertically.

    • Try multiple takes and submit your strongest.

Uploading Your Video:

  • Watch your video both before and after uploading to ensure it's what you want to share.

  • The guide to using YouTube video editor is found here

  • Give your file a clear name. Consider something like FirstNameLastName_ITF Acting Audition

  • Check that the link will allow for open access to all representatives.​

 

Tech: 

For college technical auditions, students will upload portfolio samples, and provide an accompanying video to further illustrate their skills and work details. Students may also provide an optional written response. 

Presenting Your Online Portfolio:

  • Choose three strong samples that are representative of your work and chosen major. 

  • Each of your samples should be clear and quality -- good production or process photos, or easily readable documents.

  • Since you're unable to share your whole portfolio, you need to be especially thoughtful about which pieces you pick.

    • Try to include samples that are recent, so representatives can see your current capabilities.

    • Choose samples that are relevant to the work you hope to be doing in your chosen major at college. 

    • Choose samples that are well-photographed or clearly readable. Though you will be able to expand in the written response, the sample should be able to speak for itself to a certain extent.

  • Types of samples could include:

    • drafting

    • sketches

    • works in progress

    • renderings (fully completed/colored)

    • production photos

    • light plots

    • pages from journals, promptbooks or marketing materials

Filming Your Interview Video:

  • Video should be 3-5 minutes of you speaking about your work.

  • The goal is to provide additional context around the work samples you have submitted and who you are as a technician/designer.

  • You may consider including additional images or close-ups of work if that adds value to the conversation.

  • Consider addressing some of the following: 

    • Your work processes, challenges, and takeaways from the productions featured above. 

    • Additional details around the work you did that may not be communicated by images alone.

    • Your working relationship with the production team and your philosophy on how to effectively serve in your particular role.

  • Find an effective filming location

    • Area should be quiet so we can hear you.

    • Film in front of a non-distracting background. If possible, choose a solid-color wall or consider hanging a sheet behind you.

    • Dress neatly, and in a contrasting color from your background.

    • Make sure you are lit enough to be clearly visible.

Uploading Your Video:

  • Watch your video both before and after uploading to ensure it's what you want to share.

  • The guide to using YouTube video editor is found here

  • Give your file a clear name. Consider something like FirstNameLastName_ITF Acting Audition

  • Check that the link will allow for open access to all representatives.

Answering the Optional Response Question:

  • Provide further context to the attached samples, including more about your work, processes, challenges, and takeaways from the featured productions.

  • Elaborate more about your work generally, your work philosophy, why you're interested in your particular major, etc.

  • Include a link to your website or additional production photos if desired.